The Building Information Council (Bouw Informatie Raad, or BIR) promotes widespread application of BIM in the Dutch construction and infrastructure industry. BIR is a unique partnership between various stakeholders in the construction industry, where the members represent both their construction industry segment and their own company. They make practical agreements that are in the interests of the entire industry and ensure these are implemented within their own segment. The partnership focuses on implementing BIM to strengthen the quality, continuity and competitive position of the Dutch construction and infrastructure industry. The resources cotained on the website help to accelerate the development and adoption of BIM within the Netherlands.

Making the transition to working with BIM will greatly benefit an organization. A successful BIM implementation will make the exchange of digital information more efficient. This, in turn, will contribute to minimizing failure costs, minimizing loss of information and clarifying workflows and schedules. Implementing BIM will have an impact on an organization, and investments (in the IT department and in education) will have to be made and the way the company and its employees work (together) will change. These changes require extra effort from staff, managing this transition properly is the key to success. This leaflet lays out a series of steps that will help you manage this process.

https://www.bimloket.nl//documents/Kenniskaart_5_-_BIM_transitie.pdf

The Building Information Council (Bouw Informatie Raad, or BIR) promotes widespread application of BIM in the Dutch construction and infrastructure industry. BIM improves cooperation between the links in the construction chain through a system of integrated building information management, whereby all relevant information is available during the complete life cycle of the building, from design to maintenance. BIR is a unique partnership between various stakeholders in the construction industry. The members represent both their construction industry segment and their own company. They make practical agreements that are in the interests of the entire industry and ensure these are implemented within their own segment. The partnership focuses on implementing BIM to strengthen the quality, continuity and competitive position of the Dutch construction and infrastructure industry. The construction industry could be given a real boost if the implementation of BIM can be accelerated in close cooperation with all industry stakeholders. BIM facilitates quality and efficiency improvements and faster construction at lower costs. BIR is organized in three administrative units: the Council, the Programme Office and the Programme Team.

BIR aims to be the driving force behind the implementation and development of BIM by coordinating, directing, streamlining and linking the various BIM initiatives. BIR further wishes to promote knowledge sharing and the integration of BIM in construction education. BIR’s goals and activities are described in a programme plan hosted on the website which is updated annually. The programme plan published in 2014 and entitled ‘BIM: the driving force behind a stronger construction industry’ describes BIR’s vision of BIM, its goals and the strategy it has set out to achieve these. In 2015, this programme plan was updated with the addendum ‘Communicating and assimilating BIM’, followed in 2016 by ‘Sharing BIM knowledge and BIM Loket’. ‘Assimilating BIM in government policy’ was published in 2017. The website contains areas around BIM education and explaining ‘what is BIM’. There is also a publication section with several resources which can be used.

https://www.digigo.nu/bdr+bouw+digitaliseringsraad/default.aspx

Rijkswaterstaat is part of the Dutch Ministry of Infrastructure and Water Management and responsible for the design, construction, management and maintenance of the main infrastructure facilities in the Netherlands. Rijkswaterstaat manage and develop the main road network and waterway network plus the main water systems. They endeavour to create a sustainable living environment for the country. Rijkswaterstaat work with others to ensure that the country is protected against flooding, that there is sufficient green space and an adequate supply of clean water, and that the citizens of the Netherlands are able to travel quickly and safely from A to B. Jointly promoting safety, mobility and the quality of life in the Netherlands is what Rijkswaterstaat stands for.

The information processes of construction projects must go well. Bringing and keeping the object to be built in the right place has more to do with measurements than with information processes. Nevertheless, requirements are also required for this in the contracts. It is also important to collect the right data for management. These are necessary for the execution of the management, but also to create multi-year maintenance plans and budgets. On the one hand, the maintenance contracts are about which area data Rijkswaterstaat provides during the tender to make good tenders possible. On the other hand, Rijkswaterstaat itself needs data from and information about the acreage for its own asset management tasks and legal responsibilities. Rijkswaterstaat have begun to require the use of BIM in the contracts for its projects. This website contains many resources relating to the organisations current developments.

https://www.rijkswaterstaat.nl/zakelijk/zakendoen-met-rijkswaterstaat/werkwijzen/werkwijze-in-gww/data-eisen-rijkswaterstaatcontracten

The Central Government Real Estate Agency (Rijksvastgoedbedrijf) was formed in January 2016 by the merger of four government real estate agencies: the Defence Real Estate Agency, the Government Buildings Agency, the State Property and Development Agency, and the Government Real Estate Directorate. Their portfolio includes prisons, court buildings, military barracks, airports, defence sites, ministerial offices, ports, tax offices, listed buildings and historical monuments, museums and palaces. The agencies purpose is to make these buildings and sites available in order to meet the property needs of central government. The Central Government Real Estate Agency uses BIM to obtain up-to-date, reliable information about buildings under its management.

BIM gives the Central Government Real Estate Agency reliable information on its stock of buildings and other assets which it can then use to make better and more informed future decisions. The agency will use the information from BIM for various reasons, for example:
– to manage contracts
– to manage buildings
– to monitor the quality, safety and health aspects of our buildings
– to account for the buildings under our management as part of our stock
The Agencies use of BIM complements their efforts to maintain professional commissioning practices in the public sector. The Agency have prescribed a set of BIM standards for building and maintenance providers, known as the RVB BIM Norm. A provider must supply a permanent stream of up-to-date building information product in order to comply with these standards, for example in the form of building models and graphics. These products contain the data prescribed under the standards. The Agency prescribe the RVB BIM Norm for DBFMO contracts and for a number of integrated management contracts.

https://www.rijksvastgoedbedrijf.nl/expertise-en-diensten/b/building-information-modelling

BIM Loket is working towards a sector in which working with BIM and open standards is the norm. As part of this they need to develop information and training related to BIM to upskill the industry and increase the capability to deliver these requirements. The BIM Loket website contains lots of information and support documentation like this foundation to information delivery. Collaboration is better if the information we build on is interchangeable, structured, unambiguous, correct, complete and reusable. The BIM basic information delivery specification (BIM basis ILS) is a good first step for making this ambition a reality.

The ILS Design & Engineering was created to communicate the information needs for the design and engineering phase unambiguously and recognizably. This specifies what information must be present in the process, where, and when. Not knowing when and where to provide or expect information causes frustrations, errors and an inefficient process. This problem seems to be becoming increasingly acute due to the increasing computerization and digitization. In our fragmented sector, an organization alone will not be able to break this ban and we must collectively implement structural improvements. The ILS O&E symbolizes the activation of the collective and the integral approach.
The solution offered is to make sure that we understand each other, for this, there must be an understanding of the content on the one hand and recognition of the way of communicating on the other. With the launch of ILS O&E, the sector has a tool with which organizations within projects can create a project-specific ILS. Alignment has been found on content and the way of communicating. By standardizing the demand side (communicating the information needs), the supply side can organize itself more efficiently and effectively. This will contribute in its entirety to the integrality of the design process and the transfer of information to production.

https://www.bimloket.nl/p/97/ilsoene

BIM Loket is working towards a sector in which working with BIM and open standards is the norm. As part of this they need to develop information and training related to BIM to upskill the industry and increase the capability to deliver these requirements. The BIM Loket website contains lots of information and support documentation like this template for the BIM Protocol and BIM Implementation Plan. For the application of BIM in a construction project, good contract and work agreements are indispensable. Such agreements are usually recorded in BIM Protocols or BIM Implementation Plans. Practice shows a wide variety of protocols and implementation plans. These terms are used interchangeably and in different meanings. A few years ago, the former BIR Building Information Council already noted a growing need for clarity. To give substance to this, the BIR Working Group BIM Protocol launched two models at the time: the “National Model BIM Protocol” and the “National Model BIM Implementation Plan”. The Model BIM Protocol is intended as a basis for recording project-specific contract provisions around BIM. The Model BIM Execution Plan is a template that project teams can use to record their mutual BIM work agreements. The Models also offer a clear conceptual framework, which is in line with developments in countries around us and is prepared for future European BIM standards.

The National Models should provide more clarity in the terminology used. In practice, for example, different organizations appear to use the term ‘BIM Protocol’ in different meanings. The growing practice is that in most cases a ‘BIM Protocol’ is drawn up after the contracts between client and contractor(s) have already been signed. The parties involved may then discover that a number of agreements that they record should have already been contractually arranged. It is also possible that agreements in a BIM Protocol conflict with contract provisions. This situation can be brought to an end by separating the contractual provisions and the cooperation agreements on the application of BIM. Following the British example, the contractual BIM provisions are included in a ‘BIM Protocol’ (a contract document) and the BIM collaboration agreements that construction partners make among themselves in a ‘BIM Implementation Plan’.
The National Model BIM Protocol has two versions:
An editable version in Word that you can use as a template for your contractual BIM provisions;
An extensive PDF version with – in addition to the template itself – further explanations and instructions; you can use this version as a manual when filling in the template.
There are also two versions of the National Model BIM Implementation Plan:
An editable version in Word that you can use as a template for your BIM appointments;
An extensive PDF version with – in addition to the template itself – further explanations and instructions; you can use this version as a manual when filling in the template.

https://www.bimloket.nl/p/115/BIM-Protocol-en-BIM-Uitvoeringsplan

The Building Information Council (Bouw Informatie Raad, or BIR) promotes widespread application of BIM in the Dutch construction and infrastructure industry. BIR is a unique partnership between various stakeholders in the construction industry, where the members represent both their construction industry segment and their own company. They make practical agreements that are in the interests of the entire industry and ensure these are implemented within their own segment. The partnership focuses on implementing BIM to strengthen the quality, continuity and competitive position of the Dutch construction and infrastructure industry. The resources cotained on the website help to accelerate the development and adoption of BIM within the Netherlands.

This second part leaflet looking at the legal aspect of BIM forms a checklist for projects. This checklist (how to work together with/in a BIM) shows topics about which agreements can be made in the context of BIM. The topics in this checklist are derived from BIM protocols used in the market, combined with topics that have emerged from practice (in particular Pioneering’s BIM protocol 2.0). For a project where BIM (at least from BIM level 2) will be used – in whatever project phase – it is advisable to go through the checklist below in a start-up meeting about the BIM deliverables to be made to date.

https://www.bimloket.nl//documents/Kenniskaart_4B_-_BIM_juridisch_checklist_werkafspraken.pdf