The construction industry is facing a new opportunity to be reborn as a high-tech industry through the spread of smart construction technology as it converges with the advanced technologies of the 4th industrial revolution such as IoT, robots, and AI. In particular, BIM, a convergence technology of three-dimensional design and big data which integrates and utilizes information from the entire construction cycle. BIM effects planning, design, procurement, construction, maintenance, and enables stakeholders at each stage to efficiently manage their information. It can be said to be a key means of smart construction that can maximize the productivity, constructability, and efficiency of the construction process through better communication and collaboration. The Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport (MLIT) will actively support the early settlement and activation of BIM in order to completely reorganize the existing construction process based on two-dimensional drawings and a segmented execution system for each construction stage. To this end, MLIT intend to realize smart construction through innovation, through the full introduction of BIM and an integrated collaboration system. MLIT would like to establish a guideline system that suggests procedures and methods. The BIM guideline system is divided into the basic and implementation guidelines commonly presented by the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport and the application guidelines set according to the characteristics of each client.

The first publication from MLIT is the “Construction Industry BIM Basic Guidelines”, which is the highest common guideline dealing with basic principles and standards for the application of BIM in the construction industry, and the “Construction Industrial BIM Implementation Guidelines”. In addition, the client groups should prepare the ‘BIM application guidelines for each sector’ and the ‘BIM practice guidelines for each sector’ that determine detailed implementation plans according to the type of project and the practical characteristics of each client. As the first step, the Ministry of Land, Infrastructure and Transport has published this ‘Basic Guidelines for Construction Industry BIM’ which is the highest level guideline, and plans to prepare the ‘Construction Industry BIM Implementation Guidelines’ in 2021. In addition, MLIT plan to release the “Construction Industry BIM Roadmap,” which includes BIM development strategies and action plans, such as the mandatory application of BIM for public construction projects. It is hoped that this ‘Basic Guidelines for BIM in the Construction Industry’ will serve as a good opportunity to smoothly discuss BIM application standards and required levels among implementing entities, and to actively share and utilize various construction data to enhance synergy.

http://www.molit.go.kr/USR/policyData/m_34681/dtl.jsp?search=&srch_dept_nm=&srch_dept_id=&srch_usr_nm=&srch_usr_titl=Y&srch_usr_ctnt=&search_regdate_s=&search_regdate_e=&psize=10&s_category=p_sec_3&p_category=&lcmspage=1&id=4516

The Building Information Council (Bouw Informatie Raad, or BIR) promotes widespread application of BIM in the Dutch construction and infrastructure industry. BIR is a unique partnership between various stakeholders in the construction industry, where the members represent both their construction industry segment and their own company. They make practical agreements that are in the interests of the entire industry and ensure these are implemented within their own segment. The partnership focuses on implementing BIM to strengthen the quality, continuity and competitive position of the Dutch construction and infrastructure industry. The resources cotained on the website help to accelerate the development and adoption of BIM within the Netherlands.

Making the transition to working with BIM will greatly benefit an organization. A successful BIM implementation will make the exchange of digital information more efficient. This, in turn, will contribute to minimizing failure costs, minimizing loss of information and clarifying workflows and schedules. Implementing BIM will have an impact on an organization, and investments (in the IT department and in education) will have to be made and the way the company and its employees work (together) will change. These changes require extra effort from staff, managing this transition properly is the key to success. This leaflet lays out a series of steps that will help you manage this process.

https://www.bouwinformatieraad.nl/main.php?mode=download_file&id=25

The Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE) is the Government’s lead business-facing agency. MBIE plays a central role in shaping and delivering a strong New Zealand economy. These guidelines are produced by the MBIE. Their purpose is to provide government agencies with guidance on the government’s standards of good practice for the development of their construction procurement practices, and to support those agencies to improve the quality and consistency of their construction procurement practices.

The Guidelines consist of a suite of sections, each covering a subject matter area. They are considered to be live documents which be updated and added to ensure they remain current and relevant. The latest version of each section along with accompanying tools and templates are available to download from www.procurement.govt.nz

https://www.procurement.govt.nz/assets/procurement-property/documents/building-information-modelling-construction-procurement.pdf

The Building Information Council (Bouw Informatie Raad, or BIR) promotes widespread application of BIM in the Dutch construction and infrastructure industry. BIR is a unique partnership between various stakeholders in the construction industry, where the members represent both their construction industry segment and their own company. They make practical agreements that are in the interests of the entire industry and ensure these are implemented within their own segment. The partnership focuses on implementing BIM to strengthen the quality, continuity and competitive position of the Dutch construction and infrastructure industry. The resources cotained on the website help to accelerate the development and adoption of BIM within the Netherlands.

This two page leaflet looks at how the habits, behavior and persistence of corporate culture are often underestimated when introducing BIM within a company’s way of work. Working with BIM requires employees to develop different competences. It also requires a change in mindset. In this leaflet the most common BIM roles in the Dutch construction sector and the accompanying competences expected from the employees are described and explained. BIM roles can be added to an employee’s existing job description and used in assessments, they can also be used as educational targets/goals for employees.

https://www.bouwinformatieraad.nl/main.php?mode=download_file&id=24

The Building Information Council (Bouw Informatie Raad, or BIR) promotes widespread application of BIM in the Dutch construction and infrastructure industry. BIR is a unique partnership between various stakeholders in the construction industry, where the members represent both their construction industry segment and their own company. They make practical agreements that are in the interests of the entire industry and ensure these are implemented within their own segment. The partnership focuses on implementing BIM to strengthen the quality, continuity and competitive position of the Dutch construction and infrastructure industry. The resources cotained on the website help to accelerate the development and adoption of BIM within the Netherlands.

This leaflet appendix to the leaflet 3 looks at the various BIM Competency Profiles. The leaflet talks through the competancies of the various project participants from Manager, to Cooordinator and through to Modeller.

https://www.bimloket.nl//documents/Kenniskaart_3_bijlage_-_BIM-competentieprofielen.pdf

The Building Information Council (Bouw Informatie Raad, or BIR) promotes widespread application of BIM in the Dutch construction and infrastructure industry. BIR is a unique partnership between various stakeholders in the construction industry, where the members represent both their construction industry segment and their own company. They make practical agreements that are in the interests of the entire industry and ensure these are implemented within their own segment. The partnership focuses on implementing BIM to strengthen the quality, continuity and competitive position of the Dutch construction and infrastructure industry. The resources cotained on the website help to accelerate the development and adoption of BIM within the Netherlands.

BIM was initially mainly used as a 3D model, coupled with standardized, validated information from structures in the design phase. Today, BIM is applied much more widely. Applying BIM can now also mean that the model with construction information is used across project phases, that it is passed on, or collaborated in by more parties in the construction chain. In civil engineering, some clients have chosen a different approach route. These clients focus on the information about the building, linked to a geographical file and not directly on the 3D representation. The emphasis is on exchanging current, standardized and validated information during the life cycle with construction partners and within the organization using open BIM standards and libraries. All of this change needs updates to the legal situation around BIM. This leaflet explains over two pages the key facts to consider when looking at the legal aspect of BIM.

https://www.bimloket.nl//documents/Kenniskaart_4A_-_BIM_juridisch_algemeen.pdf